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Top 5 Questions to Starting Your Art-Based Business by Paula Kersch

Top 5 questions

Once you have decided that working for others day in and day out has grown more than tiresome, and you find less and less time to do the things you love, Art Storm will be here for you.

That moment in life when you start to feel like your hobby or passion could make you money, that all your efforts placed in someone elses company have been wasted, and flexibility sounds more than appealing; it is now a necessity.

You have now decided that creating a business and selling products is the path for you. Where to start now? It is time to ask some questions:

  • What type of business do you want to have?
  • What is the purpose of your business?
  • Who are your target customers?
  • What are your primary product / service?
  • What is the primary function of your product / service?

When answering these questions, it is best to dig as deeply as possibly. Beginning to ask questions about the answers to your first question, in order to get to the essence of your idea. The core essence of your business idea or brand understands what your product or service is and also what it is not. I highly recommend reading "The Old Rules of Marketing are Dead" by Timothy R. Pearson. He lays out criteria that a core essence must meet in order to transcend to the next level of positioning that product or service.

Whether you are inventing, re-inventing or just contemplating your product or service, you always have to be mindful of the purpose.

What drove this fleeting idea to fruition? Passions only go so far in all aspects of life but finding purpose gives way to the awe of an idea and brings it meaning.

Have you thought about these first two questions? Taking time to cultivate and grow an idea into a product or service always being mindful of its essence is hard, but like Theodore Roosevelt said, “Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, and difficulty”.

After answering the first two questions in depth, the others may seem effortless to answer. Defining a target audience might feel constraining to you, but just remember that you’re not excluding anyone; you’re choosing where to spend your time and efforts. Selecting a target audience will help save you resources. Focusing on a portion of the people who might be interested in your products will allow you to communicate and engage with that segment more deeply.

Questions or comment about this article? Contact the author, Paula Kersch, at paulakersch@gmail.com.



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